Historic Districts & Buildings

Arlington Village Potential Residential NCA

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Designations:

Survey Results  2003 2003         
Description Significance Theme Period
Area Boundary CHR Status NR Criteria
Citation References
Survey Description
The Neighborhood Conservation Area is located on the northwest side of Magnolia Avenue, occupying the entire block between Davidson and McKenzie Streets, and half of the block between McKenzie and Castleman Streets. It consists of eight single-family residences on adjacent lots, all dating to the early 20th century. According to City records, the majority of these houses were constructed between 1922 and 1928, while the two at the southwestern end of the district were built between 1908 and 1910. The architectural designs of the eight houses showcase some of the most popular styles during the 1900-1930 era, with four specimens of the Craftsman, including the California Bungalow subtype; two examples of the Spanish/Mediterranean influence; and one each of the Neoclassical and Colonial Revival movements, represented by the two oldest buildings in the district. The five houses between Davidson and McKenzie Streets are situated on larger lots within the 1909 Davidson Subdivision, and are generally larger in size and more elaborate in decorative details. They are typical of the elegant, but not extravagant, homes along the Magnolia Avenue streetcar line, once a favored residential corridor among upper middle-class Riversiders. The three houses between McKenzie and Castleman Streets, on smaller lots in the 1905 Magnolia Tract, are notably more simplistic in dimension and character, consistent with what is often termed "cottages" or "bungalows" when referring to the more modest residential architecture of the time. Together, the eight residences in the district present a good cross-section of suburban residential development in the Arlington area in 1900-1930, during the first major growth spurt of the community. As a result of changing land use along Magnolia Avenue in the post-WWII period, most of the residences in this district have been converted to other uses. Today, four of the eight houses are occupied by offices, with another one housing a retail business. The exterior features of the house at 9363 Magnolia Avenue, apparently still in residential use, have been significantly altered, and several others have also received various minor alterations. The two houses at 3505 and 3535 Magnolia Avenue, in contrast, retain excellent historic integrity despite their current use as offices.

District Map

 
 

Representative Structures